Charlie Simmer grew up in Terrace Bay, Ontario on the north shore of Lake Superior. It was here where his hockey skills were cultivated playing minor hockey as a child. He left town to play for the Kenora Muskies and later moved to the OHL Soo Grey Hounds. After being drafted by the California Seals, who later moved to Cleveland to become the Barons, he then signed with the Los Angeles Kings.

Here he was united with Marcal Dionne and Dave Taylor to form The Triple Crown Line. When united with Dionne and Taylor, Simmer scored 21 goals in 38 games to close out the 1978-79 season. The next season, he scored 56 goals in 64 games. The next season, he scored 56 goals in 65 games. That’s a total of 133 goals in 167 games, or an average of 0.80 goals per game. For some context, in his brilliant NHL career, Wayne Gretzky averaged 0.60 goals per game. During these two seasons Charlie Simmer was an NHL first team all-star left-wing twice and played in 1981 All Star Game at the L.A. Forum. 

A terrible injury ended Simmer's dream season on March 2, 1981. During a game in Toronto, Simmer's right leg was shattered. He didn't skate again until late November. His damaged leg was held together by a metal plate and nine screws.

In 1984 Simmer had the chance to play in the All Star Game in New Jersey before he was traded to Boston in the fall of 1984. Here he had his first chance to play on an original six team and play alongside Ray Bourque in the old Boston Garden. After the 1986 season, Simmer was voted the Bill Masterton Trophy winner by the media. After the 1987 season he was traded to the Pittsburgh Penguins. 

As Charlie puts it, he fell into broadcasting by accident during the Kings run to the finals in 1993 and started full time the next season when the Anaheim Mighty Ducks joined the NHL. He moved on to Phoenix when the Winnipeg Jets relocated in 1996. In 2005, Simmer moved to Calgary where he broadcasts games for Rogers Sportsnet. Charlie is married to Jody, and has three children Brittany, Jake, and Austyn. 



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